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All About Coyotes

Communication

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Coyotes have many ways of communicating with each other and with other animals. The most familiar form of communication is vocalization, or making different sounds. Many other animals communicate through vocalization: dogs bark when they feel threatened; cats purr when they are content; birds chirp and sing to attract other birds. Coyotes use four different types of sounds to communicate: howling, barking, yelping, and huffing.

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Howling is the coyote sound that is most commonly heard. Coyotes howl to "talk" to other coyotes in the area. The howl lets other coyotes know where they are. It also helps to reunite separated members of the pack. The howl is a high-pitched, eerie noise. It is usually heard at night. Sometimes, other coyotes will join in the howling. Stop and Think!

When young coyotes are playing with one another, they yelp to express excitement or to give a warning. Yelps are short, high-pitched noises.

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Coyotes bark when they are trying to protect themselves or their families. The bark is warning noise. It tells enemies to stay away. It sounds similar to a dog's bark.

The final type of vocalization that coyotes use is called huffing. This is a low-pitched, quiet noise. Female coyotes use it to call their pups.

In addition to vocalization, coyotes communicate with each other and with other animals by "marking their territory." They do this by making a border with urine or "scat" (droppings). By marking an area with urine or scat a pack of coyotes can claim an area as its own. Neighboring packs are hesitant to cross into "marked" territory. Stop and Think!

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Coyotes communicate main through vocalization.

Howling is for locating other coyotes.

Yelping is to show excitement or to give warning.

Barking is for warning others.

Huffing is for mothers to call their pups.

Coyotes also communicate by marking their territories.

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Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

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Monty's Thoughts

When I visualize this scene, I pay close attention to the description of the coyote's howl and what it is used for. I take the perspective of the coyotes when they are howling and when they hear a howl.



Monty's Response

I see another coyote standing at a distance, and I want to communicate with him. I tilt my head back and let out a howl. I see him doing the same in response to my howl.

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Hali's Thoughts

I like to 'stand back' and visualize a scene to help me understand it. The images in the page show what coyotes look like when they howl and bark. These images make the text descriptions come alive for me.



Hali's Response

I see coyotes roaming about in the open fields. Suddenly, a howl stops them in their tracks and they freeze momentarily. Their ears are trained towards the sound of the howl. Then, they dash in the direction of the howl.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

When I visualize this scene, I pay close attention to the description of the coyote's howl and what it is used for. I take the perspective of the coyotes when they are howling and when they hear a howl.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

I like to 'stand back' and visualize a scene to help me understand it. The images in the page show what coyotes look like when they howl and bark. These images make the text descriptions come alive for me.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

One of my favorite reading strategies is visualizing. Sometimes, I look at a picture on the page and then close my eyes to imagine this picture as one part of the bigger story. It really made the story come alive.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I summarize, I imagine myself telling my friend about the story. I try to emphasize the important points and leave out details that seem less central to the story.

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Monty's Thoughts

When I looked for the best summary, I tried to find one that included all the different types of communication, not only vocalization, with brief descriptions of each.



Monty's Response

Coyotes communicate mainly by making four different types of sounds: howling, yelping, barking, and huffing. Coyotes also communicate by marking their territories with urine or droppings.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I summarize, I try to include all the important facts to capture the gist of the passage. I also try to state them as concisely as possible, instead of writing every detail.

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Pedro's Self Check

To check your summary, ask yourself if your summary—

Captures the main ideas and key information.

Has the right amount of detail (not too much, not too little).

Combines several ideas or facts into one statement.

Paraphrases, or explains in your own words.

Includes information from text and images.

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I looked for the best summary, I tried to find one that included all the different types of communication, not only vocalization, with brief descriptions of each.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I summarize, I try to include all the important facts to capture the gist of the passage. I also try to state them as concisely as possible, instead of writing every detail.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

To check your summary, ask yourself if your summary—

Captures the main ideas and key information.

Has the right amount of detail (not too much, not too little).

Combines several ideas or facts into one statement.

Paraphrases, or explains in your own words.

Includes information from text and images.

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I read a complicated text, I like to break it into smaller pieces and write a summary for each piece. The pieces might be chapters, paragraphs or even lines in a poem. When I put all of the summaries together, it helps me understand the overall picture more clearly.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I visualize, I like to use all of my senses. I imagine the sights, sounds, smells, feelings, and even tastes. I like to imagine extra details to expand on what the author has written.