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The Call of the Wild

Chapter 1

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Into the Primitive

Old longings nomadic leap,
Chafing at custom's chain;
Again from its brumal sleep
Wakens the ferine strain.

Buck Resources Resources did not read the newspapers, or he would have known that trouble was brewing, not alone for himself, but for every tidewater dog, Stop and Think! strong of muscle and with warm, long hair, from Puget Sound to San Diego. Because men, groping in the Arctic darkness, had found a yellow metal, and because steamship and transportation companies were booming the find, thousands of men were rushing into the Northland. Resources These men wanted dogs, and the dogs they wanted were heavy dogs, with strong muscles by which to toil, and furry coats to protect them from the frost.

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Buck lived at a big house in the sun-kissed Santa Clara Valley. Judge Miller's place, it was called. It stood back from the road, half-hidden among the trees, through which glimpses could be caught of the wide cool veranda that ran around its four sides. The house was Stop and Think! approached by graveled driveways which wound about through wide-spreading lawns and under the interlacing boughs of tall poplars. At the rear things were on even a more spacious scale than at the front. There were great stables, where a dozen grooms and boys held forth, rows of vine-clad servants' cottages, an endless and orderly array of outhouses, long grape arbors, green pastures, orchards, and berry patches. Then there was the pumping plant for the artesian well, and the big cement tank where Judge Miller's boys took their morning plunge and kept cool in the hot afternoon.

And over this great demesne Buck ruled. Here he was born, and here he had lived the four years of his life. It was true, there were other dogs. There could not but be other dogs on so vast a place, but they did not count. They came and went, resided in the populous kennels, or lived obscurely in the recesses of the house after the fashion of Toots, the Japanese pug, or Ysabel, the Mexican hairless, strange creatures that rarely put nose out of doors or set foot to ground. On the other hand, there were the fox terriers, a score of them at least, who yelped fearful promises at Toots and Ysabel looking out of the windows at them and protected by a legion of housemaids armed with brooms and mops.

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Stop and Think!

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Foreshadowing

Author's Craft

Interpret the foreshadowing, or clues about what might happen next. Choose the statement that best describes the kind of events the author is foreshadowing in this paragraph.


Click "Show" to see the clues that helped the coaches make their interpretations.
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MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

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Foreshadowing

Author's Craft

Now you can be creative and mix up your own foreshadowing. What kind of central theme or future even do you want to foreshadow?




Click "Show" to see the parts you can change.
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Choose from the pull-downs to create your new foreshadowing. Remember your goal as you choose! Click "Done" when you are ready.


Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

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Foreshadowing

Author's Craft
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Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases that provide the foreshadowing in this passage. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


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MontyHali

Stop and Think!

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Setting

Author's Craft

Interpret the setting – the time, place, and tone of the story. Choose the statement that best describes this setting.


Click "Show" to see the clues that helped the coaches make their interpretations.
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Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

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Setting

Author's Craft

Now you can be creative and mix up your own setting for the story. What kind of setting do you want to create?




Click "Show" to see the parts you can change.
Show

Choose from the pull-downs to create your new setting. Remember your goal as you choose! Click "Done" when you are ready.


Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

Level Level 1Level 2Level 3
Close

Setting

Author's Craft
Text help toolbar

Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases that provide the setting in this passage. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHali

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Monty's Thoughts

When I looked for Jack London's foreshadowing, I really focused on the phrase 'trouble was brewing.' It seemed that Buck and other strong dogs were the ones who would be in trouble.

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Hali's Thoughts

To understand the meaning of foreshadowing, I study the words that suggest something in the future or describe a change in the situation.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions:

Are there phrases about the future?

Is there a change happening in the weather, the setting, or the mood?

Are there objects, sounds, lighting, or scenic elements that suggest a feeling of happiness, sadness, danger, excitement, or another emotion?

Do characters or the narrator make an observation that might be a hint about something to come later?

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Monty's Thoughts

I chose to change the foreshadowing to suggest something wonderful would happen. It was interesting to see how much the mood of the paragraph shifted just by changing a few words!

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

To understand the meaning of foreshadowing, I study the words that suggest something in the future or describe a change in the situation.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions:

Are there phrases about the future?

Is there a change happening in the weather, the setting, or the mood?

Are there objects, sounds, lighting, or scenic elements that suggest a feeling of happiness, sadness, danger, excitement, or another emotion?

Do characters or the narrator make an observation that might be a hint about something to come later?

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I looked for Jack London's foreshadowing, I really focused on the phrase 'trouble was brewing.' It seemed that Buck and other strong dogs were the ones who would be in trouble.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

To understand the meaning of foreshadowing, I study the words that suggest something in the future or describe a change in the situation.

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I read about Judge Miller's place I could visualize the large porches, the orchards, and the lawns under the trees. The author's setting at this point in the story made Buck's life look comfortable and peaceful.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I am trying to understand setting, I look for words and phrases that describe the place and time, and look at the images to see how the setting is portrayed visually.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions:

Where is it?

When is it?

What is the weather like?

What are the social conditions?

What is the landscape or environment like?

What special details make the setting vivid?

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Monty's Thoughts

I chose to change the setting to a rugged wild place. I chose words and phrases that described a wilderness kind of environment. When I read my paragraph aloud, I was surprised to see how much it changed the mood of the story.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I choose words and phrases to make a new setting, I think about the kind of place I am describing and choose words that help my reader to visualize what it is like.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions:

Where is it?

When is it?

What is the weather like?

What are the social conditions?

What is the landscape or environment like?

What special details make the setting vivid?

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I read about Judge Miller's place I could visualize the large porches, the orchards, and the lawns under the trees. The author's setting at this point in the story made Buck's life look comfortable and peaceful.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I am trying to understand setting, I look for words and phrases that describe the place and time, and look at the images to see how the setting is portrayed visually.