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How Coyote Stole Fire

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One afternoon, as Coyote Resources was hunting in the newly fallen snow, he came upon a family huddled in a circle. They were singing a sad song Literary Deviceabout their lost loved ones, who had died in the ice-cold winter blizzards. The sorrow in their voices prickled the fur on Coyote's neck. Coyote saw how their mournful tears froze on their cheeks, and how their icy breath hung in the air. Coyote, like many of the animals, had no need for the warmth of fire, because he had a thick winter coat. Literary DeviceBut he felt sorry for the Humans, and decided to help them find fire.

Coyote knew of the Fire Beings, who lived on a nearby mountaintop. The Fire Beings were not known for their hospitality. They kept fire to themselves because they were selfish and afraid to share it with the Humans. But Coyote, known as the Trickster of the animals, knew there must be a way to steal fire from the Fire Beings. So he hurried off to the mountaintop to watch them.Stop and Think!

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Stop and Think!

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Visualize

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Choose a visual description, or mental image, that connects with what you see when you read this paragraph. Click 'Show' to see the clues that helped the coaches visualize. Click on the coaches for help.



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Use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect clues—important words and phrases—that help you visualize. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your visualization.


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MontyHaliPedro


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Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

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Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


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Monty's Thoughts

When I get ready to visualize this scene, I think about where I might be standing and looking. Sometimes I 'look' out of Coyote's eyes to imagine what I might see, sometimes I 'look' out of another character's eyes. When I visualize this way I really start feeling the characters' emotions.



Monty's Response

When I close my eyes, I imagine Coyote watching the humans. I can hear the sounds of the humans crying, and I can see their sad faces and the frozen ice on their cheeks. Just imagining this image makes me sad and cold.

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Hali's Thoughts

Starting with words or illustrations, I close my eyes and imagine the place, the time, the way people look, the weather, and all kinds of details. This makes the scene and the story come alive for me.



Hali's Response

When I stand back, I can see the family huddled together. I can see Coyote watching the family and feeling sorry for them. Their bodies all stand out against the white of the newly fallen snow.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

When I get ready to visualize this scene, I think about where I might be standing and looking. Sometimes I 'look' out of Coyote's eyes to imagine what I might see, sometimes I 'look' out of another character's eyes. When I visualize this way I really start feeling the characters' emotions.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

Starting with words or illustrations, I close my eyes and imagine the place, the time, the way people look, the weather, and all kinds of details. This makes the scene and the story come alive for me.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

Visualization works for me because I like to draw and to create movies. Sometimes I sketch out a scene based on a picture in the book and add speech balloons to capture what is happening.

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Hali's Thoughts

I enjoy asking questions about the story. I like highlighting important parts in the paragraph and asking questions to identify key information.