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The Call of the Wild

Chapter 2

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16curly
d

Stop and Think!So sudden was it, and so unexpected, that Buck was taken aback. He saw Spitz run out his scarlet tongue in a way he had of laughing; and he saw Francois, swinging an axe, spring into the mess of dogs. Three men with clubs were helping him to scatter them. It did not take long. Two minutes from the time Curly went down, the last of her assailants were clubbed off. But she lay there limp and lifeless in the bloody, trampled snow, almost literally torn to pieces, the swart half-breed standing over her and cursing horribly. Literary DeviceThe scene often came back to Buck to trouble him in his sleep. So that was the way. No fair play. Once down, that was the end of you. Well, he would see to it that he never went down. Spitz ran out his tongue and laughed again, and from that moment Buck hated him with a bitter and deathless hatred.

Before he had recovered from the Stop and Think!shock caused by the tragic passing of Curly, he received another shock. Francois fastened upon him an arrangement of straps and buckles. It was a harness, such as he had seen the grooms put on the horses at home. And as he had seen horses work, so he was set to work, hauling Francois on a sled to the forest that fringed the valley, and returning with a load of firewood. Though his dignity was sorely hurt by thus being made a draught animal, he was too wise to rebel. He buckled down with a will and did his best, though it was all new and strange. Francois was stern, demanding instant obedience, and by virtue of his whip receiving instant obedience; while Dave, who was an experienced wheeler, nipped Buck's hindquarters whenever he was in error. Spitz was the leader, likewise experienced, and while he could not always get at Buck, he growled sharp reproof now and again, or cunningly threw his weight in the traces to jerk Buck into the way he should go. Buck learned easily, and under the combined tuition of his two mates and Francois made remarkable progress. Ere they returned to camp he knew enough to stop at "ho," to go ahead at "mush," to swing wide on the bends, and to keep clear of the wheeler when the loaded sled shot downhill at their Resources heels.

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MontyHaliPedro


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Use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect clues—important words and phrases—that help you visualize. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your visualization.


Click on the Coaches for help. To check your visualization, compare with the coaches.

MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

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Reading Strategy

Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

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Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


Click on the Coaches for help.

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Monty's Thoughts

The author, Jack London, states that Buck realizes that there is 'no fair play' in the Alaskan wilderness and that Buck would be sure to watch out for himself. I used these clues to make my prediction.



Monty's Response

I predict that there will be a lot of competition among the sled dogs.

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Hali's Thoughts

I could not believe how cruelly the dogs treated Curly. Buck was shocked too. In the picture, you can see Buck and the other dogs standing around Curly's body in disbelief. I based my prediction on Buck's reaction to Curly's death.



Hali's Response

I predict that Buck will never let what happened to Curly happen to him and that Buck will keep his guard up from now on.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you read more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

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Monty's Thoughts

The author, Jack London, states that Buck realizes that there is 'no fair play' in the Alaskan wilderness and that Buck would be sure to watch out for himself. I used these clues to make my prediction.

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Hali's Thoughts

I could not believe how cruelly the dogs treated Curly. Buck was shocked too. In the picture, you can see Buck and the other dogs standing around Curly's body in disbelief. I based my prediction on Buck's reaction to Curly's death.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you read more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

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Monty's Thoughts

I enjoy mysteries and use the prediction strategy a lot. Of course, predictions change as you get new information, so sometimes my early predictions turn out to be way off-base!

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Hali's Thoughts

Have you ever read a few pages and not remembered a word of it? When this happens, I look carefully at the pictures on the page to help me to form a visual image. This strategy helps me to remember the storyline much better.

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Monty's Thoughts

When I get ready to visualize this scene, I think about where I might be standing and looking. Sometimes I 'look' out of Buck's eyes to imagine what I might see, sometimes I 'look' out of another character's eyes. When I visualize this way I really start feeling the characters' emotions.



Monty's Response

I keep seeing the man in the red sweater dropping the hatchet and shifting the club to his right hand. He looks calm and really mean. I am afraid for Buck because the man has a weapon, and Buck has never been beaten before.

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Hali's Thoughts

I like to 'stand back' and visualize a whole scene with all of the people in it. That way I can imagine the place, the time, the way people look, the weather, and all kinds of details the author gives me. This makes the scene and the story come alive for me.



Hali's Response

When I close my eyes I imagine that I am one of the men who brought Buck here, and I am sitting on the fence and watching him get beaten. Buck charges repeatedly, and the club hitting him over and over. Buck hits the ground hard. I realize that these men have no sympathy for Buck because they are afraid of him.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

Visualize this scene! Highlight and collect clues: important words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your visualization. Want to see how the coaches highlighted the text? Use the Show button and the Coaches for help. To check your visualization check (coach's name) rubric or just read on!

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

I like to 'stand back' and visualize a whole scene with all of the people in it. That way I can imagine the place, the time, the way people look, the weather, and all kinds of details the author gives me. This makes the scene and the story come alive for me.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

One of my favorite reading strategies is visualizing. Sometimes I close my eyes and imagine the story, other times I like to draw what I am seeing. Once I took photographs and made a short movie with them. It really made the story come alive.

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Hali's Thoughts

I really find it helpful to stop and ask myself questions about the story, especially when there is something that I don't understand very well. Stopping and forming a question can really help me because I try to answer my own question, and if I can't, I look up information in Resources or Strategy Help, or talk to a friend or teacher.