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The Call of the Wild

Chapter 3

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Francois was surprised, too, when they shot out in a tangle from the disrupted nest and he divined the cause of the trouble. "A-a-ah!" he cried to Buck. "Give it to him by Gar! Give it to him, the dirty thief!"

Spitz was equally willing. He was crying with sheer rage and eagerness as he circled back and forth for a chance to spring in. Buck was no less eager, and no less cautious, as he likewise circled back and forth for the advantage. But it was then that the unexpected happened, the thing which projected their struggle for supremacy far into the future, past many a weary mile of trail and toil.

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An oath from Perrault, the resounding impact of a club upon a bony frame, and a shrill yelp of pain, heralded the breaking forth of pandemonium. the camp was suddenly discovered to be alive with skulking furry forms—starving huskies, four or five score of them, who had scented the camp from some Indian village. Literary Device They had crept in while Buck and Spitz were fighting, and when the two men sprang among them with stout clubs they showed their teeth and fought back. They were crazed by the smell of the food. Perrault found one with its head buried in the grub-box. His club landed heavily on the gaunt ribs, and the grub-box was capsized on the ground. On the instant a score of the famished brutes were scrambling for the bread and bacon. The clubs fell upon them unheeded. They yelped and howled under the rain of blows, but struggled none the less madly till the last crumb had been devoured.

In the meantime the astonished team-dogs had burst out of their nests only to be set upon by the fierce invaders. Never had Buck seen such dogs. It seemed as though their bones would burst through their skins. They were mere skeletons, draped loosely in draggled hides, with blazing eyes and slavered fangs. Literary DeviceBut the hunger-madness made them terrifying, irresistible. There was no opposing them. The team-dogs were swept back against the cliff at the first onset. Buck was beset by three huskies, and in a trice his head and shoulders were ripped and slashed. The din was frightful. Billee was crying as usual. Dave and Sol-leks, dripping blood from a score of wounds, were fighting bravely side by side. Joe was snapping like a demon. Literary Device Once his teeth closed on the fore leg of a husky, and he crunched down through the bone. Pike, the malingerer, leaped upon the crippled animal, breaking its neck with a quick flash of teeth and a jerk. Buck got a frothing adversary by the throat, and was sprayed with blood when his teeth sank through the jugular. The warm taste of it in his mouth goaded him to greater fierceness. He flung himself upon another, and at the same time felt teeth sink into his own throat. It was Spitz, treacherously attacking from the side. Stop and Think!

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Monty's Thoughts

When I visualize this scene, I pay close attention to the detailed descriptions of the dogs' menacing appearances, their wounds and injuries, and the moves. These descriptions help me imagine the scene vividly, allowing me to capture the horror of the moment.



Monty's Response

I see the terrible scene of the battle between the sled-team and the starving huskies. The dogs look menacing and they are fighting viciously. Their wounds are severe and it seems that some dogs, if not dead, will have debilitating injuries.

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Hali's Thoughts

I like to 'stand back' and visualize a whole scene with all of the people in it. That way I can imagine the place, the time, the way people look, the weather, and all kinds of details the author gives me. This makes the scene and the story come alive for me.



Hali's Response

When I visualize this scene, the dogs are fighting with all their might, even by throwing themselves at their attackers. I imagine that I am one of the dog-sled drivers and I am watching this bloody battle.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

When I visualize this scene, I pay close attention to the detailed descriptions of the dogs' menacing appearances, their wounds and injuries, and the moves. These descriptions help me imagine the scene vividly, allowing me to capture the horror of the moment.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

I like to 'stand back' and visualize a whole scene with all of the people in it. That way I can imagine the place, the time, the way people look, the weather, and all kinds of details the author gives me. This makes the scene and the story come alive for me.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

One of my favorite reading strategies is visualizing. Sometimes, I look at a picture on the page and then close my eyes to imagine this picture as a movie, or I read the text and draw a picture of what I am seeing in my mind. It really made the story come alive.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I summarize, I imagine myself telling my friend about the story. I try to emphasize the important points and leave out elaborate details. I also remember not to include my interpretation into the summary, as this changes the author's story.