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The Call of the Wild

Chapter 4

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Stop and Think! Buck remembered the man in the red sweater, and retreated slowly; nor did he attempt to charge in when Sol-leks was once more brought forward. But he circled just beyond the range of the club, snarling with bitterness and rage; and while he circled he watched the club so as to dodge it if thrown by Francois, for he was become wise in the way of clubs.

The driver went about his work, and he called to Buck when he was ready to put him in his old place in front of Dave. Buck retreated two or three steps. Francois followed him up, whereupon he again retreated. After some time of this, Francois threw down the club, thinking that Buck feared a thrashing. But Buck was in open revolt. He wanted, not to escape a clubbing, but to have the leadership. It was his by right. He had earned it, and he would not be content with less.

Perrault took a hand. Between them they ran him about for the better part of an hour. They threw clubs at him. He dodged. They cursed him, and his fathers and mothers before him, and all his seed to come after him down to the remotest generation, and every hair on his body and drop of blood in his veins; and he answered curse with snarl and kept out of their reach. He did not try to run away, but retreated around and around the camp, advertising plainly that when his desire was met, he would come in and be good.

Francois sat down and scratched his head. Perrault looked at his watch and swore. Time was flying, and they should have been on the trail an hour gone. Francois scratched his head again. He shook it and grinned sheepishly at the courier, who shrugged his shoulders in sign that they were beaten. Then Francois went up to where Sol-leks stood and called to Buck. Buck laughed, as dogs laugh, yet kept his distance. Francois unfastened Sol-leks's traces and put him back in his old place. The team stood harnessed to the sled in an unbroken line, ready for the trail. There was no place for Buck save at the front. Once more Francois called, and once more Buck laughed and kept away.

"Throw down de club," Perrault commanded.

Francois complied, whereupon Buck trotted in, laughing triumphantly, and swung around into position at the head of the team. His traces were fastened, the sled broken out, and with both men running they dashed out on to the river trail.

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Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

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Monty's Thoughts

The author, Jack London, writes that Buck feels like he has earned the position and that he 'would not be content with less.' I used these clues to make my prediction.



Monty's Response

I predict that Buck will stand up

for what he believes he has earned.

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Hali's Thoughts

I tried to put myself in Buck's position to see how he felt when Perrrault and Francois chose Sol-leks to be lead dog instead of Buck. I based my prediction on the way that I think Francois and Perrault's decision made Buck feel.



Hali's Response

I predict that Francois will change his mind and give Buck the leadership position.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you read more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

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Monty's Thoughts

The author, Jack London, writes that Buck feels like he has earned the position and that he 'would not be content with less.' I used these clues to make my prediction.

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Hali's Thoughts

I tried to put myself in Buck's position to see how he felt when Perrrault and Sol-leks chose Sol-leks to be lead dog instead of Buck. I based my prediction on the way that I think Francois and Perrault's decision made Buck feel.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you read more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

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Monty's Thoughts

When I predict what is likely to happen in the next scene, I always gather all clues in the current chapter that the author might have intentionally included within the context. If there are some changes in the setting or characters, I like to incorporate them into my prediction. It is always fun to predict the ending of the story, as well as the next scene.

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Hali's Thoughts

I really find it helpful to stop and ask myself questions about the story, especially when there is something that I don't understand very well. Stopping and forming a question can really help me because I try to answer my own question, and if I can't, I loop up information in Resources or Strategy Help, or talk to a friend or teacher.