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The Call of the Wild

Chapter 7

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The Sounding of the Call

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When Resources Resources Buck earned sixteen hundred dollars in five minutes for John Thornton, he made it possible for his master to pay off certain debts and to journey with his partners into the East after a fabled lost mine, the history of which was as old as the history of the country. Many men had sought it; few had found it; and more than a few there were who had never returned from the quest. This lost mine was steeped in tragedy and shrouded in mystery. No one knew of the first man. The oldest tradition stopped before it got back to him. From the beginning there had been an ancient and ramshackle cabin. Dying men had sworn to it, and to the mine the site of which it marked, clinching their testimony with nuggets that were unlike any known grade of gold in the Northland.Stop and Think!

But no living man had looted this treasure house, and the dead were dead; wherefore John Thornton and Pete and Hans, with Buck and half a dozen other dogs, faced into the East on an unknown trail to achieve where men and dogs as good as themselves had failed. They sledded seventy miles up the Yukon, swung to the left into the Stewart River, passed the Mayo and the McQuestion, and held on until the Stewart itself became a streamlet, threading the upstanding peaks which marked the backbone of the continent.

John Thornton asked little of man or nature. He was unafraid of the wild. With a handful of salt and a rifle he could plunge into the wilderness and fare wherever he pleased and as long as he pleased. Being in no haste, Indian fashion, he hunted his dinner in the course of the day's traveling; and if he failed to find it, like the Indian, he kept on traveling, secure in the knowledge that sooner or later he would come to it. So, on this great journey into the East, straight meat was the bill of fare, ammunition and tools principally made up the load on the sled, and the timecard was drawn upon the limitless future.

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Choose the best prediction based on text clues and your knowledge. Click 'Show' to see the clues that helped the coaches predict. Click on the coaches for help.



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Make a prediction! Use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect clues—important words and phrases—to help you make a prediction. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your prediction.


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Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

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Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


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Monty's Thoughts

I saw that Thornton was preparing for a journey to the fabled lost mine, so I gathered relevant clues about the destination and the journey. Many descriptions about the lost mine helped me predict what would happen to Buck and Thornton in the journey.



Monty's Response

Many people did not return from their journeys to the lost mine. I predict that trouble looms ahead.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I predict, I try to pick up clues from the changes in the surrounding characters, weather, or other setting. The author's description of the changes and of the characters' feelings on the changes helps me make a better prediction of the author's intention.



Hali's Response

I predict that they will

encounter tragedy and mystery during this journey.

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Pedro's Self Check

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Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you

more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

I saw that Thornton was preparing for a journey to the fabled lost mine, so I gathered relevant clues about the destination and the journey. Many descriptions about the lost mine helped me predict what would happen to Buck and Thornton in the journey.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I predict, I try to pick up clues from the changes in the surrounding characters, weather, or other setting. The author's description of the changes and of the characters' feelings on the changes helps me make a better prediction of the author's intention.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

read

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you

more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I see foreshadowing, I often like to use that moment to predict. Authors give you clues about what is going to happen by creating a change in the weather or an observation about a character, sometimes something happening that a character does not see. That is usually a great hint about what might happen later.

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Hali's Thoughts

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Have you ever

a few pages and not remembered a word of it? If I stop and visualize the scene like a picture in my head, it helps me remember much better.