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Sonnet XVIII

Sonnet

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Shakespeare
d

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Stop and Think! Stop and Think! Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?
Stop and Think! Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Literary Device
Stop and Think! Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, Literary Device
And summer's lease hath all too short a date: Literary Device
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, Literary Device
And often is his gold complexion dimm'd, Literary Device
And every fair from fair sometime declines, Literary Device
By chance, or nature's changing course untrimm'd: Literary Device
But thy eternal summer shall not fade, Literary Device
Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st, Literary Device
Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, Literary Device
When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st, Literary Device
So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, Literary Device
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee. Literary Device Literary Device Stop and Think!
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Stop and Think!

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Characterization

Author's Craft

Interpret the characterization, or clues, about what Shakespeare's beloved is like in the poet's eyes.


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MontyHaliPedro


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Characterization

Author's Craft

Now you can be creative and mix up your own characterization. What kind of character would you like to make the person the poet is speaking to in the poem?




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Choose from the pull-downs to create your new characterization. Remember your goal as you choose! Click "Done" when you are ready.


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MontyHaliPedro


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Characterization

Author's Craft
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Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases that provide the characterization in this passage. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


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MontyHali

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Predict

Reading Strategy

Choose the best prediction based on text clues and your knowledge. Click 'Show' to see the clues that helped the coaches predict. Click on the coaches for help.



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MontyHaliPedro


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Predict

Reading Strategy
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Make a prediction! Use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect clues—important words and phrases—to help you make a prediction. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your prediction.


Click on the Coaches for help. To check your prediction click on Monty, or just read on!

MontyHaliPedro


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Choose Strategy

Reading Strategy

Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

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Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


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MontyHali

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Visualize

Reading Strategy

Choose a visual description, or mental image, that connects with what you see when you read this paragraph. Click 'Show' to see the clues that helped the coaches visualize. Click on the coaches for help.



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MontyHaliPedro


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Visualize

Reading Strategy
Text help toolbar

Use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect clues—important words and phrases—that help you visualize. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your visualization.


Click on the Coaches for help. To check your visualization, compare with the coaches.

MontyHaliPedro


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Choose Strategy

Reading Strategy

Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

Text help toolbar

Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHali

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Question

Reading Strategy

Choose a question that is about something important to know and remember about this passage:



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MontyHaliPedro


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Question

Reading Strategy
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Create a question! Use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect clues—important words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your question.


Click on the Coaches for help. To check your question, answer it and see if it helps you understand the story better.

MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

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Choose Strategy

Reading Strategy

Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

Text help toolbar

Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHali

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Summarize

Reading Strategy

Choose the best summary, the one that captures the most important ideas in the chapter. Click on the coaches for help.


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MontyHaliPedro


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Summarize

Reading Strategy

Create your own summary. Use the Key Points list below or use the Text Help toolbar to highlight and collect key points you choose from the text. Then write a summary in your own words. You could also try sketching your summary.

Key Points

1. The poet says his beloved is more pleasant than a summer day.

2. The poet describes the imperfections of nature's beauty.

3. The poet says his beloved's beauty will live forever in this poem.

Text help toolbar

Or use the Text Help toolbar above to highlight and collect the key events you want to use. Paste your notes into a word processor and write, sketch, or share your summary by email.


Click on the Coaches for help. To check your summary, compare with the coaches.

MontyHaliPedro


Stop and Think!

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Choose Strategy

Reading Strategy

Choose one of the strategies you've practiced here—visualize, summarize, predict, or question. Pick one that works well for you and is suited to the passage.

Text help toolbar

Use the Text Help toolbar located above to highlight and collect the words and phrases. Paste them into your word processor and write, sketch, or discuss your response.


Click on the Coaches for help.

MontyHali

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Monty's Thoughts

I used what I know about summer days to help me understand the specific traits Shakespeare describes in the second line.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I think about characterization, I pay close attention to the adjectives the author uses in his or her descriptions.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions when trying to understand characterization:

What does the character look like?

How does the character behave towards others? How do others behave toward the character?

What does the character seem to care about?

What adjectives does the author use to describe the character's personality?

What does the character think or say?

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Monty's Thoughts

I chose to change the poem so that the poet was writing to a cheerful, energetic person. I noticed the words in line 2 really developed the meaning of the comparison in line 1.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I want to describe a character, I put a lot of thought into the adjectives I choose.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions when trying to understand characterization:

What does the character look like?

How does the character behave towards others? How do others behave toward the character?

What does the character seem to care about?

What adjectives does the author use to describe the character's personality?

What does the character think or say?

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Monty's Thoughts

I used what I know about summer days to help me understand the specific traits Shakespeare describes in the second line.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I think about characterization, I pay close attention to the adjectives the author uses in his or her descriptions.

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Monty's Thoughts

I noticed the poet seems to be speaking directly to someone he admires. I used this as a clue about what kind of poem this would be.



Monty's Response

I predict this poem will be about love.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I want to make a prediction about a poem, I pay special attention to the tone the author uses in the opening lines.



Hali's Response

The poet seems to be speaking in an adoring tone. I predict this will be a poem about the poet's admiration of someone he loves.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you read more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

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Monty's Thoughts

I noticed the poet seems to be speaking directly to someone he admires. I used this as a clue about what kind of poem this would be.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I want to make a prediction about a poem, I pay special attention to the tone the author uses in the opening lines.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions to help yourself make a good prediction:

Does your prediction connect what you know with information in the text or image?

Did you make an educated guess, not a 'wild' guess?

Do your predictions change as you read more and get more information that doesn't match your earlier prediction?

Did you predict what might happen (a 'crystal ball' kind of prediction) OR what the text or image is preparing you for ('predicting the moves of the text')?

Did you use keywords in the text structure to help yourself make predictions? (Example: If the text contains the words, 'for instance,' you can expect to find examples.)

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I want to make a prediction, I look for clues not only in what the author shows the reader but also how the author shows it. Emotion, tone, and mood are often important clues about what will follow.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I see a simile or a metaphor, I like to visualize the image. That way I can almost experience what the author describes.

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Monty's Thoughts

When I read these lines, I wanted to stop and take the time to experience the imagery of nature that the poet describes.



Monty's Response

I visualized the sun shining brightly, and I felt the sun burning my skin. Then I read the next line, and I imagined dark clouds covering the sky and blocking the sun. Doing this helped me feel the moods Shakespeare is trying to convey.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I visualize images in poetry, I try to imagine the sights, sounds, and other sensations that go along with what the poet portrays.



Hali's Response

I visualized a summer day. I thought about my own memories of summer, and I decided to picture a visit to the beach. I felt the warm sand under my feet. I heard the splashes of people in the ocean, and I saw the white clouds floating across a sunny sky. When I thought about these things, I felt very peaceful.

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Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

When I read these lines, I wanted to stop and take the time to experience the imagery of nature that the poet describes.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I visualize images in poetry, I try to imagine the sights, sounds, and other sensations that go along with what the poet portrays.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Ask yourself these questions about your visualization:

Am I seeing what is most important in the story?

Can I close my eyes and see a vivid movie of what is happening?

Does my visualization help me understand the characters' feelings or an important event in the plot?

Can I see in my mind the place or scene described?

Could I draw or find a picture of what I am imagining?

Can I see, hear, or smell what the author is describing?

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Monty's Thoughts

When I visualize, I like to use all of my senses. I imagine the sights, sounds, smells, feelings, and even tastes. I like to imagine extra details to expand on what the author has written.

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Hali's Thoughts

I like to make predictions about what the poet will say at the end of the poem. I look for clues in the beginning and middle of the poem to help me guess what the conclusion will be. Sometimes the ending is not what I expected—and I find that can be a good thing!

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Monty's Thoughts

I noticed Shakespeare devoted six lines of the poem to describing the fact that nature's beauty is only temporary, so I wanted to determine why this point was so important.



Monty's Response

I asked myself why the poet makes such a point of describing nature's imperfections. I thought the reason might be that Shakespeare is illustrating a contrast. He wants his beloved to look better by comparison.

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Hali's Thoughts

When read poetry, I like to ask myself questions to make sure I understand what the poet is trying to say in each line.



Hali's Response

I asked myself about the meaning of the line 'every fair from fair sometime declines.' I learned that 'fair' can mean 'beautiful,' so I thought Shakespeare might be saying that all beautiful things eventually become less beautiful.

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Pedro's Self Check

Do your questions—

Ask about something important, not trivial?

Get to the point?

Often start with a question word (who, what, when, why, how)?

Focus on parts of the text or illustrations?

Require a substantive answer, not just a 'yes or no'?

Ask about character, setting, key events, lessons learned, objectivity, bias, or perspective?

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Monty's Thoughts

I noticed Shakespeare devoted six lines of the poem to describing the fact that nature's beauty is only temporary, so I wanted to determine why this point was so important.

Close Window

Hali's Thoughts

When I read poetry, I like to ask myself questions to make sure I understand what the poet is trying to say in each line.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

Do your questions—

Ask about something important, not trivial?

Get to the point?

Often start with a question word (who, what, when, why, how)?

Focus on parts of the text or illustrations?

Require a substantive answer, not just a 'yes or no'?

Ask about character, setting, key events, lessons learned, objectivity, bias, or perspective?

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

When I ask myself questions about a text, I find I discover more about what the author is trying to convey. I often start my questions with the words 'who,' 'what,' 'when,' 'why,' and 'how.'

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Hali's Thoughts

When I read a complicated text, I like to break it into smaller pieces and write a summary for each piece. The pieces might be chapters, paragraphs or even lines in a poem. When I put all of the summaries together, it helps me understand the overall picture more clearly.

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Monty's Thoughts

I noticed this poem seems to have three main ideas. The first idea comes in lines 1 and 2, the next in lines 3–8, and the last in lines 9–14.



Monty's Response

Shakespeare compares his beloved to a summer day, and says that his poem will last forever, preserving beauty that in nature dies away.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I want to summarize a poem, I first think about the meaning of each line. Then I try to decide what the main ideas are.



Hali's Response

Shakespeare says his beloved's loveliness surpasses that of a summer day. He depicts a series of images to illustrate nature's shortcomings. Shakespeare writes that unlike nature's beauty, his beloved's beauty will be immortal as long as people read this poem.

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Pedro's Self Check

To check your summary, ask yourself if your summary—

Captures the main ideas and key information.

Has the right amount of detail (not too much, not too little).

Combines several ideas or facts into one statement.

Paraphrases, or explains in your own words.

Includes information from text and images.

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Monty's Thoughts

I noticed this poem seems to have three main ideas. The first idea comes in lines one and two, the next in lines three through eight, and the last in lines nine through fourteen.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I want to summarize a poem, I first think about the meaning of each line. Then I try to decide what the main ideas are.

Close Window


Pedro's Self Check

To check your summary, ask yourself if your summary—

Captures the main ideas and key information.

Has the right amount of detail (not too much, not too little).

Combines several ideas or facts into one statement.

Paraphrases, or explains in your own words.

Includes information from text and images.

Close Window

Monty's Thoughts

One thing I think about when I write summaries is that it's important to use my own words. That way, I know I understand what I'm writing and am not just copying the author's words.

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Hali's Thoughts

When I finish reading, I like to ask myself this question: 'What is the main thing the author has tried to convey?' When I come up with an answer, it helps me to understand and remember what I read.